QA vs. QC
QA vs. QC
QA vs. QC
QA vs. QC
Eleonora Grigane

Eleonora Grigane

QA Specialist

May 16, 2024

3 min read

DEFECT PREVENTION VS. DEFECT DETECTION

For many who aren't deeply involved in software development and testing, the terms quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) might seem interchangeable. Both aim to improve product quality, but they serve distinct functions and processes. Let’s first define each of them.

QA focuses on ensuring that all necessary methodologies, techniques, and procedures are adhered to during the product development phase. This guarantees the highest possible quality of an e-commerce product. In contrast, QC is about validation, ensuring that previously set quality requirements are met through systematic testing and debugging. Essentially, QA is about defect prevention, while QC deals with defect detection and correction.

💡 While QA is preventive, focusing on stopping defects before they appear, QC is corrective, emphasizing the identification and fixing of defects.



QA: Preventing Defects During Development

QA is a component of quality management that involves activities and procedures, aiming to prevent defects and are performed during the product development phase to ensure a high-quality release. For example, including "HOW TO TEST" section tasks for developers can be an effective QA strategy. QA involves such activities as requirements definition, design reviews, and code inspections. These processes help in establishing standards and practices that ensure high-quality outcomes from the beginning.

Some key activities defined by QA include:

  • Requirements gathering

  • Design and prototyping

  • Programming and code reviews

  • Version control

  • Continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD)

  • Configuration management

  • Test planning and execution

  • Release management

  • Deployment and integration

  • Customer acceptance and feedback.

QC: Detecting Defects After Development

QC, on the other hand, is a reactive process that focuses on defect detection. QC is a subset of QA. Its goal is to confirm the quality of the e-commerce product through testing, identifying, and debugging defects. QC is typically conducted after a particular feature has been developed. For instance, bug tickets, identifying product errors, testing against quality requirements, maintaining test reports, and determining areas for improvement in quality or user experience are typical indicators used in QC. QC involves systematic testing against quality requirements and documenting issues for resolution.

Quality Assurance vs. Quality Control: Detailed Breakdown

In today's digital age, delivering exceptional digital experiences is crucial for user retention, customer loyalty, and steady revenue streams. Achieving digital quality requires a focus on both QA and QC. Although they share common goals, they employ different approaches.

Similarities and Differences

Both QA and QC strive to ensure a high-quality product, follow organizational policies and procedures, mitigate major issues and costs, involve some cost and time investment, and provide opportunities for continuous improvement. However, they differ in several key ways:

  • Proactive vs. Reactive: QA is proactive, aiming to prevent defects from occurring by establishing a framework for quality. QC is reactive, identifying and fixing defects in the developed product.

  • When It Occurs: QA occurs throughout the entire software development lifecycle (SDLC), while QC takes place after a product or feature has been developed.

  • Process vs. Product: QA focuses on improving processes and procedures, while QC focuses on the final product, finding and fixing defects.

  • Prevent vs. Identify Defects: QA aims to prevent defects through practices like code reviews and collaboration, while QC aims to identify and prioritize defects through testing.

  • Who Does the Work: QA involves the entire organization, including business, development, and testing teams, while QC is typically handled by a smaller, dedicated team.

Conclusion: The Interdependence of QA and QC

While QA and QC have distinct roles, they are interdependent and crucial for delivering high-quality software products. Effective QA reduces the number of defects reaching the QC stage, and thorough QC ensures that any remaining issues are identified and addressed before the product reaches customers. Together, QA and QC help businesses create high-quality products, optimize team workflows, improve customer experiences and loyalty, reduce costs, and iterate confidently and efficiently.

DEFECT PREVENTION VS. DEFECT DETECTION

For many who aren't deeply involved in software development and testing, the terms quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) might seem interchangeable. Both aim to improve product quality, but they serve distinct functions and processes. Let’s first define each of them.

QA focuses on ensuring that all necessary methodologies, techniques, and procedures are adhered to during the product development phase. This guarantees the highest possible quality of an e-commerce product. In contrast, QC is about validation, ensuring that previously set quality requirements are met through systematic testing and debugging. Essentially, QA is about defect prevention, while QC deals with defect detection and correction.

💡 While QA is preventive, focusing on stopping defects before they appear, QC is corrective, emphasizing the identification and fixing of defects.



QA: Preventing Defects During Development

QA is a component of quality management that involves activities and procedures, aiming to prevent defects and are performed during the product development phase to ensure a high-quality release. For example, including "HOW TO TEST" section tasks for developers can be an effective QA strategy. QA involves such activities as requirements definition, design reviews, and code inspections. These processes help in establishing standards and practices that ensure high-quality outcomes from the beginning.

Some key activities defined by QA include:

  • Requirements gathering

  • Design and prototyping

  • Programming and code reviews

  • Version control

  • Continuous integration/continuous delivery (CI/CD)

  • Configuration management

  • Test planning and execution

  • Release management

  • Deployment and integration

  • Customer acceptance and feedback.

QC: Detecting Defects After Development

QC, on the other hand, is a reactive process that focuses on defect detection. QC is a subset of QA. Its goal is to confirm the quality of the e-commerce product through testing, identifying, and debugging defects. QC is typically conducted after a particular feature has been developed. For instance, bug tickets, identifying product errors, testing against quality requirements, maintaining test reports, and determining areas for improvement in quality or user experience are typical indicators used in QC. QC involves systematic testing against quality requirements and documenting issues for resolution.

Quality Assurance vs. Quality Control: Detailed Breakdown

In today's digital age, delivering exceptional digital experiences is crucial for user retention, customer loyalty, and steady revenue streams. Achieving digital quality requires a focus on both QA and QC. Although they share common goals, they employ different approaches.

Similarities and Differences

Both QA and QC strive to ensure a high-quality product, follow organizational policies and procedures, mitigate major issues and costs, involve some cost and time investment, and provide opportunities for continuous improvement. However, they differ in several key ways:

  • Proactive vs. Reactive: QA is proactive, aiming to prevent defects from occurring by establishing a framework for quality. QC is reactive, identifying and fixing defects in the developed product.

  • When It Occurs: QA occurs throughout the entire software development lifecycle (SDLC), while QC takes place after a product or feature has been developed.

  • Process vs. Product: QA focuses on improving processes and procedures, while QC focuses on the final product, finding and fixing defects.

  • Prevent vs. Identify Defects: QA aims to prevent defects through practices like code reviews and collaboration, while QC aims to identify and prioritize defects through testing.

  • Who Does the Work: QA involves the entire organization, including business, development, and testing teams, while QC is typically handled by a smaller, dedicated team.

Conclusion: The Interdependence of QA and QC

While QA and QC have distinct roles, they are interdependent and crucial for delivering high-quality software products. Effective QA reduces the number of defects reaching the QC stage, and thorough QC ensures that any remaining issues are identified and addressed before the product reaches customers. Together, QA and QC help businesses create high-quality products, optimize team workflows, improve customer experiences and loyalty, reduce costs, and iterate confidently and efficiently.

Eleonora Grigane
Eleonora Grigane

Eleonora Grigane

QA Specialist

May 16, 2024

3 min read

QA vs. QC
QA vs. QC

Ralfs J. Gaigulis

Ralfs J. Gaigulis

COO at HiQality

COO at HiQality

Are you considering introducing or improving QA practices in your operations? Make sure you get it right with our team of QA experts by your side. Reach out for a free consultation by using the contact form below!

Are you considering introducing or improving QA practices in your operations? Make sure you get it right with our team of QA experts by your side. Reach out for a free consultation by using the contact form below!

Interested in manual QA?
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Interested in manual QA?
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Interested in manual QA?
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Interested in manual QA?
Let us know!

Interested in manual QA?
Let us know!

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